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Iconic Symbols and the Bewitchment of Childhood Infuse Artists’ Joint Exhibit

1-Bryan

2-Ri

By Margot Duell

Symbolism is one aspect that joins the disparate works of Ri Anderson and Bryan Jones, two artists who will be opening a joint exhibit of their latest works at an art space on calle Hernández Macías.

In many ways, the two artists’ work couldn’t be more different: Anderson’s medium is photography, while Jones’s is painting. But both artists display a strong interes in what lies behind the surface of the everyday. Anderson’s work references bewitchment, childhood, nature and dreamlike states, while Jones’s work for this exhibit mines the rich symbolism found in that most Latin American of icons, the Panama hat.

The exhibit opens Thursday, November 14 at Hernández Macias 125. The reception is from 5–9pm.

Anderson will be showing photographs from her Betwixt series. She describes these photos as her most “Mexican” images. After raising her daughters here for 14 years, she has used the complexity of this multilayered culture for expression in a gentle form of magical realism, where portraits of her children and of herself are entwined with creatures and landscape textures to create an almost mythic world of natural enchantment. Birds and nests feature along with the arresting unfiltered gaze of the child. This is a wild and pagan world, full of concealment and magic.The prints are masterfully composed and technically superb. Each photograph emanates beauty and mystery.

Bryan Jones studied art in the 1960s at Cal Arts in Los Angeles, but instead of developing a career as a visual artist, he found himself working for 25 years as an art director and production designer in the film industry. Jones was there at the genesis of music videos. He worked with many musical luminaries and was regularly nominated and finally awarded an MTV award for best art director of the year.

Eventually, he transitioned into international store design, with a focus on gift stores for museums and art galleries. He continues to design and create architectural drawings for clients, but now, 50 years later, he is based in San Miguel de Allende, and the lure of paint and brush have reclaimed him.

These accomplished paintings of hats glow with luminosity and volume. And in their contextual simplicity, they radiate an essentiality that confers a kind of symbolic power. Like objects in the Loteria game, the hats are both literal and quintessential. The works are of varying sizes. The larger ones exude an almost archetypal power.

The works of both artists can be viewed by appointment for a limited time after the show.

Art Opening

Work by Ri Anderson and Bryan Jones

Thu, Nov 14, 5–9pm

 

Hernandez Macias 125

Iconic Symbols and the Bewitchment of Childhood Infuse Artists’ Joint Exhibit

By Margot Duell

Symbolism is one aspect that joins the disparate works of Ri Anderson and Bryan Jones, two artists who will be opening a joint exhibit of their latest works at an art space on calle Hernández Macías.

In many ways, the two artists’ work couldn’t be more different: Anderson’s medium is photography, while Jones’s is painting. But both artists display a strong interes in what lies behind the surface of the everyday. Anderson’s work references bewitchment, childhood, nature and dreamlike states, while Jones’s work for this exhibit mines the rich symbolism found in that most Latin American of icons, the Panama hat.

The exhibit opens Thursday, November 14 at Hernández Macias 125. The reception is from 5–9pm.

Anderson will be showing photographs from her Betwixt series. She describes these photos as her most “Mexican” images. After raising her daughters here for 14 years, she has used the complexity of this multilayered culture for expression in a gentle form of magical realism, where portraits of her children and of herself are entwined with creatures and landscape textures to create an almost mythic world of natural enchantment. Birds and nests feature along with the arresting unfiltered gaze of the child. This is a wild and pagan world, full of concealment and magic.The prints are masterfully composed and technically superb. Each photograph emanates beauty and mystery.

Bryan Jones studied art in the 1960s at Cal Arts in Los Angeles, but instead of developing a career as a visual artist, he found himself working for 25 years as an art director and production designer in the film industry. Jones was there at the genesis of music videos. He worked with many musical luminaries and was regularly nominated and finally awarded an MTV award for best art director of the year.

Eventually, he transitioned into international store design, with a focus on gift stores for museums and art galleries. He continues to design and create architectural drawings for clients, but now, 50 years later, he is based in San Miguel de Allende, and the lure of paint and brush have reclaimed him.

These accomplished paintings of hats glow with luminosity and volume. And in their contextual simplicity, they radiate an essentiality that confers a kind of symbolic power. Like objects in the Loteria game, the hats are both literal and quintessential. The works are of varying sizes. The larger ones exude an almost archetypal power.

The works of both artists can be viewed by appointment for a limited time after the show.

Art Opening

Work by Ri Anderson and Bryan Jones

Thu, Nov 14, 5–9pm

Hernandez Macias 125

Iconic Symbols and the Bewitchment of Childhood Infuse Artists’ Joint Exhibit

By Margot Duell

Symbolism is one aspect that joins the disparate works of Ri Anderson and Bryan Jones, two artists who will be opening a joint exhibit of their latest works at an art space on calle Hernández Macías.

In many ways, the two artists’ work couldn’t be more different: Anderson’s medium is photography, while Jones’s is painting. But both artists display a strong interes in what lies behind the surface of the everyday. Anderson’s work references bewitchment, childhood, nature and dreamlike states, while Jones’s work for this exhibit mines the rich symbolism found in that most Latin American of icons, the Panama hat.

The exhibit opens Thursday, November 14 at Hernández Macias 125. The reception is from 5–9pm.

Anderson will be showing photographs from her Betwixt series. She describes these photos as her most “Mexican” images. After raising her daughters here for 14 years, she has used the complexity of this multilayered culture for expression in a gentle form of magical realism, where portraits of her children and of herself are entwined with creatures and landscape textures to create an almost mythic world of natural enchantment. Birds and nests feature along with the arresting unfiltered gaze of the child. This is a wild and pagan world, full of concealment and magic.The prints are masterfully composed and technically superb. Each photograph emanates beauty and mystery.

Bryan Jones studied art in the 1960s at Cal Arts in Los Angeles, but instead of developing a career as a visual artist, he found himself working for 25 years as an art director and production designer in the film industry. Jones was there at the genesis of music videos. He worked with many musical luminaries and was regularly nominated and finally awarded an MTV award for best art director of the year.

Eventually, he transitioned into international store design, with a focus on gift stores for museums and art galleries. He continues to design and create architectural drawings for clients, but now, 50 years later, he is based in San Miguel de Allende, and the lure of paint and brush have reclaimed him.

These accomplished paintings of hats glow with luminosity and volume. And in their contextual simplicity, they radiate an essentiality that confers a kind of symbolic power. Like objects in the Loteria game, the hats are both literal and quintessential. The works are of varying sizes. The larger ones exude an almost archetypal power.

The works of both artists can be viewed by appointment for a limited time after the show.

Art Opening

Work by Ri Anderson and Bryan Jones

Thu, Nov 14, 5–9pm

Hernandez Macias 125

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