Ayotzinapa, Ferguson, and Building Peace

November 20th, San Miguel

By Bob Stone

How to respond when our governments fail to guarantee us freedom from their own violence and surveillance? This week’s Center for Global Justice events look at this problem as it presents itself in both the US and Mexico.

Film
Citizen Four
Tue, Aug 18, 11am
Teatro Santa Ana
La Biblioteca
Reloj 50A
150 0025
60 pesos
Discussion
“Ayotzinapa, Ferguson, and Building Peace”
Wed, Aug 19, 11am
Sala Quetzal
La Biblioteca
Reloj 50A
150 0025
60 pesos
Film
Enemy of the State
Thu, Aug 20, 11am
Teatro Santa Ana
La Biblioteca

On Tuesday, we screen and discuss Citizen Four, Laura Poitras’s edge-of-your-seat film of the start of the Edward Snowden saga. Her Oscar-winning 2014 documentary makes history. It places us in the room as earth-shattering revelations are made of the scale and depth of the “vacuuming” up of everyone’s emails, phone calls, and Internet searches.

“Ayotzinapa” and “Ferguson” are names for last fall’s twin outbursts of official violence in our two neighboring countries. On Wednesday, Mexican and US panelists who have pondered these events uncover some of their meanings.  The two names designate not so much punctual events as they do clusters of still-unresolved problems in the two intertwined histories. As a result, “Black Lives Matter” and “Ayotzinapa Solidarity” movements find themselves obliged to build peace, not merely protest.

On Thursday, we watch Enemy of the State (1998), the pioneering government surveillance thriller with Gene Hackman and Will Smith. Without his knowledge, a DC labor lawyer is given a video of a CIA agent’s murder of a US congressman. Harking back 17 years via this diverting entertainment, we can estimate the point we’ve come to.

 

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