The Art of the Crucifixion

By Camie Sands

The new lecture series, “Art: Works⎯Insights by Art Historians,” will launch Monday, March 23, with “The Art of the Crucifixion.” This is the first public opportunity to hear noted lecturer and art historian Kahren Jones Arbitman discuss the artistic evolution of this universally recognized symbol.

“The Art of the Crucifixion”
By Kahren Jones Arbitman
Mon, Mar 23, 5pm
San Miguel Playhouse
Av. Independencia 82
100 pesos

Everyone who has visited a cathedral or art museum has encountered images of the crucified Christ. A quick survey of local Sanmiguelenses revealed, however, that very few people actually look closely at what is represented. How many nails are there? Two, three, four? Does Christ wear the crown of thorns? What is written on the sign above Christ’s head? In what language? The answer is: It depends. The Bible gives scant details: “And they took Him and crucified Him.” That leaves lots of room for imagination. Early on, the church set strict rules; Byzantine art, for example, adheres so closely to theological doctrine that its images change little over the centuries. Elsewhere, especially in the West, both the church and wealthy patrons had a hand in deciding how the crucifixion should be shown. Artists of every era have been quick to add their own creative touches. Twenty-first-century artists, freed from church patronage, let loose their imaginations to create passionate testaments to their personal theology and views of political and social injustice.

Please join us for this wide-ranging artistic journey from early Christian mosaics, to Renaissance altarpieces, to contemporary murals on Monday, March 23, at 5pm at the San Miguel Playhouse, Av. Independencia 82. Free parking and concierge taxi service available. Donation: 100 pesos. All proceeds benefit the San Miguel International Chamber Music Festival, which this August will celebrate its 37th consecutive year.

Art:Works, created by Kahren Arbitman and Hope Palmer, will present lectures periodically throughout the year on topics ranging from Old Masters to Modern Masterpieces.  The date for Hope Palmer’s next lecture, “Diego Does Detroit: The Rivera Murals in the Detroit Institute of Arts,” will be announced soon. Kahren Arbitman holds a Ph.D. in art history and was an art museum director in Pennsylvania and Florida. Hope Palmer, MFA, was an associate professor of art and art history in Detroit. Presented by Art:Works⎯Insights by Art Historians.


Comments are closed

 photo RSMAtnWebAdRed13.jpg
 photo RSMAtnWebAdRed13.jpg
 photo RSMAtnWebAdRed13.jpg

Photo Gallery

Log in | Designed by Gabfire themes All original content on these pages is fingerprinted and certified by Digiprove