All Summer kids take the stage

By Margot Sunev

Theater
All Summer in a Day
By Ray Bradbury
Sun, Mar 30, 5pm
El Sindicato
Recreo 4
50 pesos

 

Patty Arrieta, Danza Arrieta Dance, and Carrie Haugh, Teatro los Escuincles, have adapted All Summer in a Day, a poignant short story by Ray Bradbury. Together they have led a nine-week performance workshop blending dance and theater. I recently sat down to chat with Carrie and Patty, two teaching artists from New York City

Margot Sunev: Why did you choose to adapt Ray Bradbury’s story for your children´s workshop?

Carrie Haugh: This story really affected me as a child. It deals with themes of moving to a new place and also of being treated a certain way because you are different.

Patty Arrieta: It’s full of beautiful imagery that we felt would combine theater and dance cohesively. More importantly, it is the heart of the story that we felt a connection to.

MS: In what ways were your students able to connect to the characters and themes in the story?

PA: The first few weeks were spent going in depth with our students about the story. We discussed their personal experiences and times when they could relate to the characters. In sharing they were able to see that even if the situations had been personal, many of them had similar experiences.

CH: Unfortunately, many children around the world deal with bullying. Taking the time to share our personal stories created a safe space where the children bonded and encouraged one another.

MS: Why are the arts important for children?

CH: The arts help build character, confidence and camaraderie among children. Through the arts young people can be the agents of healing in the world. We can use the arts to explore socially relevant and challenging issues which face a global community.

PA: I have seen the power of the arts transform lives. To have a positive way of expressing everything that you love and challenges you about life is a gift. Plus, the performing arts are so much fun!

MS: Can you tell us a little bit more about working with some of the IREE students?

CH: The theme of our show is about tolerance and inclusion. We see this workshop as an opportunity to utilize theater and dance to create a culture of inclusivity. IREE is a school for deaf children located in colonia San Antonio. We are honored to have them come in for our finale song and join our workshop students.

PA: The IREE school doesn’t always have the financial resources they need and welcomes support from the SMA community. Carrie and I were saddened to hear from the school director, Cecilia, that although the program is free many of the students can’t afford the cost of the bus to and from school each day. For this reason they can only go a couple times a week.

MS: Are there any last comments you’d like to make?

PA: A big thank you to our workshop students and parents! Thanks to Nisha Ferguson, for her design of the workshop and performance posters. To Duncan Tonatiuh, for his work on the kid’s head shots and group photos.

CH: I am so thankful to the amazing parents and families who have supported the project. Also a special thanks to Helena and The Sindicato, for opening its doors and theater to our group!

Don’t miss these talented kids for their performance on Sunday, March 30, at 5pm. El Sindicato, Recreo 4. Tickets available at the door, 50 pesos.

By Margot Sunev

P

atty Arrieta, Danza Arrieta Dance, and Carrie Haugh, Teatro los Escuincles, have adapted All Summer in a Day, a poignant short story by Ray Bradbury. Together they have led a nine-week performance workshop blending dance and theater. I recently sat down to chat with Carrie and Patty, two teaching artists from New York City

Margot Sunev: Why did you choose to adapt Ray Bradbury’s story for your children´s workshop?

Carrie Haugh: This story really affected me as a child. It deals with themes of moving to a new place and also of being treated a certain way because you are different.

Patty Arrieta: It’s full of beautiful imagery that we felt would combine theater and dance cohesively. More importantly, it is the heart of the story that we felt a connection to.

MS: In what ways were your students able to connect to the characters and themes in the story?

PA: The first few weeks were spent going in depth with our students about the story. We discussed their personal experiences and times when they could relate to the characters. In sharing they were able to see that even if the situations had been personal, many of them had similar experiences.

CH: Unfortunately, many children around the world deal with bullying. Taking the time to share our personal stories created a safe space where the children bonded and encouraged one another.

MS: Why are the arts important for children?

CH: The arts help build character, confidence and camaraderie among children. Through the arts young people can be the agents of healing in the world. We can use the arts to explore socially relevant and challenging issues which face a global community.

PA: I have seen the power of the arts transform lives. To have a positive way of expressing everything that you love and challenges you about life is a gift. Plus, the performing arts are so much fun!

MS: Can you tell us a little bit more about working with some of the IREE students?

CH: The theme of our show is about tolerance and inclusion. We see this workshop as an opportunity to utilize theater and dance to create a culture of inclusivity. IREE is a school for deaf children located in colonia San Antonio. We are honored to have them come in for our finale song and join our workshop students.

PA: The IREE school doesn’t always have the financial resources they need and welcomes support from the SMA community. Carrie and I were saddened to hear from the school director, Cecilia, that although the program is free many of the students can’t afford the cost of the bus to and from school each day. For this reason they can only go a couple times a week.

MS: Are there any last comments you’d like to make?

PA: A big thank you to our workshop students and parents! Thanks to Nisha Ferguson, for her design of the workshop and performance posters. To Duncan Tonatiuh, for his work on the kid’s head shots and group photos.

CH: I am so thankful to the amazing parents and families who have supported the project. Also a special thanks to Helena and The Sindicato, for opening its doors and theater to our group!

Don’t miss these talented kids for their performance on Sunday, March 30, at 5pm. El Sindicato, Recreo 4. Tickets available at the door, 50 pesos.

 

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