Conjuntos Compartidos – Shared Collections

By Carlos Pez

Shared Collections proposes an exhibit that covers three plastic techniques: painting, lithography and cyanotype. These are three collections that are well-differentiated because of their material bases and the way they are approached; however, they share a search for intersections in shapes, textures and colors that I have developed in recent years.

YAM Gallery Presents
Cuadernos de Piedra
by Carlos Pez (Mexico DF)
Fri, Jul 27, 7pm
YAM Gallery
Ancha de San Antonio 20 int. 1
Instituto Allende
415 15 06052

Abstract shapes explore the fundamental principles of Set Theory such as union, intersection, partition, differences, complements and symmetries. I was interested in developing plastically this theory that supports mathematics, since I am very interested in understanding how the foundation of the ultimate science is intuitive in nature, as is the creative endeavor. To me, reconciling these two ways of thinking is realizing that equilibrium of the mind is found in not excluding logic from intuition, and vice versa.

Most of the work for this exhibit is specifically performed for the gallery space so that, as a whole, it can be understood that there are different physical, emotional and intellectual contexts. After producing the pieces, I harmonized the Shared Collections at Traeger & Pinto.

Aboard the “fish tank” I drove more than 6200 miles in a journey from La Ceiba Gráfica in Coatepec, Veracruz, México, to my Leonard Codex workshop in Brooklyn. During a 12-day journey through different places, and a two-month and 15-day stay in New York, I worked with painting, lithography and cyanotype. Out of the 16 marble stones I took, I printed nine lithographic editions with the help of master printer Deborah Chaney.

The influence of cinema, literature, painting and music had the result of this exercise, road painting.

The current situation in México fosters fear of travelling freely on highways. On the contrary, in the United States, there is the guarantee of moving without toll barriers or drug traffickers. This contrast offers a mixture from the Mad Max movie, a Van Gogh landscape and the Beat generation travels. I can’t help but connect with the fear that the Burt Lancaster movie, The Swimmer, provokes in me. It is like a broken stone, a scratched notebook. However, nothing can prevent me from following water and greenery to the end of geography.

To me, it was necessary to leave behind inner ties and ignore the media paranoia in order to perform this body of work. The final result is this Notebook of Collections.

Cuaderno de Piedra – Stone Notebook

A mountain of information fits in the head of a pin, technological advantages point to the lightweight, suddenly 500 songs seem to us very few, 200 photographs barely enough to record a trip.

What need is there to carry a 51-pound piece of marble to draw a landscape on it, a memento? On the beach, sitting in front of my water colors, I would tell myself that they are the ultimate technique for the traveling artist, because they are lightweight. I would see a mess on the table that could hardly be safe from sand, wind and sea. Pieces of paper spread all over the place, small and large containers, and colors that jumped up. And I would think to myself: how is this portable? Years later my perception has changed, since truly, a set of water colors are just ants next to the white elephants that lithography stones represent.

The first time I heard my teacher, Per Anderson, say that a lithography press and its stones are portable I didn’t quite understand if he meant it as irony or if he was serious. Soon I understood that he was very serious. I can’t leave out the anecdote that inspired this project.

They say that travels illustrate; in this case, for me, travels are illustrated.

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